Birds are naturally stylish. Their feathers come in an array of colors, textures and shapes, and every now and then all the elements come together for the perfect hairdo. The Victoria crowned pigeon (shown above) is the perfect example with a crown of delicate feathers topping its noggin.

Some species have been graced with good hair for mating advantages, but regardless of the reason — these birds have head-turning tresses:

 
Dalmatian pelican

Photos: iliuta goean/Shutterstock

Dalmatian pelican

Big Bird's got nothing on the tousled feathers that top the Dalmatian pelican's head. The largest of all pelican species, Dalmatian pelicans live in wetlands in Europe, the Mediterranean and even as far as China. (That's not to say that these birds are thriving — the IUCN Red List has them listed as "vulnerable" as populations are decreasing due to draining wetlands, land development, and illegal hunting.)

* * * 
 
Crested partridge

Photo: Jez Elliott/flickr

Crested partridge

This fluffy red pouf belongs to this tropical ground bird that thrives throughout the rain forests of Southeast Asia.

* * * 
 
Great curassow

Photo: Krzysztof Wiktor/Shutterstock

Great curassow

Check out those curls! The great curassow's range stretches from Mexico throughout Central America. If you think this bird's crest indicates its attitude, you'd be right — they are known for their aggression and tendency to bite humans.

* * * 
 
Andean cock-of-the-rock

Photo: chdwckvnstrsslhm/flickr

Andean cock-of-the-rock

A surge of orange in the Andean cloud forests, this flashy male bird makes a show for the females during mating season. Like the Greasers of the 1950s, these coifed males gather in groups to impress female birds with their hopping and dancing. After mating, these males don't stay around to help rear chicks.

* * * 
 
Himalayan monal

Photo: Tambako the Jaguar/flickr

Himalayan monal

The national bird of Nepal (where it is called a "danphe") has an pretty ponytail of iridescent feathers.

* * * 
 
Nicobar pigeon

Photo: Dave Lundy/flickr

Nicobar pigeon

Not your typical city pigeon, the Nicobar pigeon's long locks form a lion-like mane. Believe it or not, this Southeast Asian species is the closest relative to the extinct dodo bird.

* * * 
 
Hoopoe

Photos: Super Prin/Shutterstock

Eurasian hoopoe

Donning a black-tipped mohawk, the hoopoe is the definition of cool. It flaunts its feathers in Africa, the Mediterranean and throughout Europe and Asia.

* * * 
 
Ornate hawk eagle

Photo: Joanne Weston/Shutterstock

Ornate hawk eagle

This eagle's faux-hawk is perfectly feathered — and he needs no gel; the crest becomes prominent when this South American eagle is excited or aggressive.

* * * 
 
Sulphur-crested cockatoo

Photo: Michael Korcuska/flickr

Sulphur-crested cockatoo

The expressive hairstyle of this large Australian bird is almost larger than life. It can stretch over five inches in length.

* * * 
 
Silver pheasant

Photo: Jareso/Shutterstock

Silver pheasant

A forest-dwelling bird of Southeast Asia, the silver pheasant's hair is accentuated by its vivid red mask.

* * * 
 
Polish crested chicken

Photo: cynoclub/Shutterstock

Polish crested chicken

Resembling more of a cartoon character than a real chicken, the polish crested chicken channels its inner Cruella DeVille with its puffed mane. It's no surprise that this breed of chicken is a show bird!

* * * 
 
Philippine eagle

Photo: Edwin Verin/Shutterstock

Philippine eagle

The critically endangered Philippine eagle is heavily protected as the national bird of the Philippines. It's griffin-like splayed crest is intimidating enough, but paired with its nickname of "monkey-eating eagle," we have no plans to bug this raptor any time soon!

* * * 
 
Crowned crane

Photo: Jenny Downing/flickr

Crowned crane

Now that's a hairstyle fit for a king — stiff, golden feathers give this grey crowned crane's head a porcupine sensibility. This endangered bird lives throughout Africa, from the savannah to the wetlands.

* * * 
 
Crested pigeon and spinifex pigeon

Photo: Jim Bendon/Flickr

Crested and spinifex pigeons

The crested pigeon (left) and spinifex pigeon both bear a striking resemblance to Alfalfa from "The Little Rascals"! These Australian birds are common (and frankly, way cooler than the pigeons we have in the United States).

* * * 
 
Anna Norris is an associate editor at Mother Nature Network. Follow her on Twitter and Google+.

Related on MNN: