Sun-bird feeding chicks

Photo: PCHT/Shutterstock

Peek in on these peeps

As humans, we don't always get the chance to peer inside birds' nests. We've rounded up a collection of photos that give a glimpse into the adorable world of chicks in nests in a variety of environments, from wetlands to cliffsides. Now that's something worth tweeting about!

Above: A sunbird gracefully flies to feed its chicks, which hang in a suspended nest.

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Great horned owlets

Photo: Brent Eades/Flickr

Great horned owlets, about 4 weeks old, peek out from their nest in the nook of a tree. Great horned owls nest throughout North and South America, usually finding a spot in an abandoned nest or a nook in a tree.

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Hoopoe feeding chick

Photo: Piotr Kamionka/Shutterstock

A hoopoe brings lunch to its hungry chick, which has taken residence in a man-made birdhouse. Hoopoes, named for their call, typically nest throughout Europe and Asia, but they can also be found in Africa, India and Southeast Asia year-round.

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Stork with chicks in rain

Photo: Photogala/Shutterstock

A white stork endures the rain with its chicks in a nest made out of sticks. Storks will use their nests for several years. Storks usually nest in Portugal, Spain, Urkraine and Poland.

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Black-browed albatross chick

Photo: Stubblefield Photography/Shutterstock

This smiling sweetie is a black-browed albatross chick, snuggled up in its ground nest on Saunders Island in the Falkland Islands, where the species has a large colony.

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Rufous hummingbird chicks in nest

Photo: Feng Yu/Shutterstock

A truly tiny home, this nest is home to two rufous hummingbird chicks. This species of hummingbird nests from Southern Alaska to California.

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Green woodpecker peeking out of its tree nest

Photo: YK/Shutterstock

A green woodpecker chick sticks its head out of its tree-trunk nest. This species nests in old deciduous trees throughout Europe.

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Starling chicks

Photo: Eoin Gardiner/Flickr

These starling chicks have nested in a gap in a stone wall in Clarinbridge, a village south of Galway, Ireland.

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Blue-winged pitta feeding chicks on forest floor

Photo: Super Prin/Shutterstock

A blue-winged pitta feeds its chicks in their nest on a forest floor in Thailand.

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Yellow-vented Bulbul

Photo: Yusmar Yahaya/Flickr

A yellow-vented bulbul chick, native to Southeast Asia, sits tucked inside its tidy nest.

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Great egret and chick

Photo: James Diedrick/Flickr

A great egret stands protectively over its baby on a nest platform in a tree. Great egrets can build nests up to 100 feet off the ground, often above the water for quick meals.

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Black-naped blue flycatcher feeding chicks

Photo: Super Prin/Shutterstock

A black-naped monarch (also known as a black-naped blue flycatcher) feeds her chicks. Native to India and southern Asia, these birds create cup nests in the forks of trees — and they decorate these nests with spider egg cases.

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Red-shouldered hawk chick in nest

Photo: dragonseye/Flickr

A (super cute!) red-shouldered hawk chick stretches its big yellow talons out atop its coniforous nest in Houston, Texas.

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Swift chick

Photo: fs-phil/Flickr

This swift chick is peeking out of a man-made nest box. Swifts have become very resourceful over the years — the chimney swift got its name from making nests in chimneys.

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Kittiwake nest with young birds

Photo: Darrel Birkett/Flickr

This kittiwake mom is clearly tired after a long day of taking care of her adorable chicks. These seabirds have made their nest on the rocky Staple Island in the Farne Islands, Northumberland, UK.

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Wedge-tailed shearwater nesting in fallen coconut tree

Photo Forest and Kim/Flickr

This wedge-tailed shearwater chick is snug as a bug in a hollowed-out fallen coconut tree. They are common throughout the Pacific, from Hawaii to Japan.

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Whiskered tern feeding chick

Photo: smishonja/Shutterstock

A whiskered tern feeds one of its chicks in the nest it created among the water lilies. Whiskered terns breed and nest in inland marshes, where they can quickly nab tiny fish to feed their chicks.

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Great horned owls

Photo: Ken Bosma/Flickr

This family of great horned owls has found an unusual home: the front window of a church in Green Valley, Arizona. Photographer Ken Bosma notes that this has been a popular nesting spot for at least 26 years.

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Anna Norris is an associate editor at Mother Nature Network. Follow her on Twitter and Google+.

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