Bald eagles can be found in Alaska and in all 48 contiguous U.S. states, and the birds often return to the same nests year after year, making the national animal a popular subject for webcams.

Georgia’s first and only streaming Eagle Cam is now live, and viewers can tune in for an up-close look at the majestic birds in real time.

The birds first appeared at Berry College in March 2012, building a nest in a pine tree not far from the school’s main entrance in Rome, Ga.

Although eagles have been spotted around the college for several years, this was the first documented bald eagle nest in Floyd County.

The birds had two offspring in late December — an event that attracted students, birders and wildlife photographers from across the state.

Their eaglets fledged, or flew, during the last week of April, and the bald eagle couple were last seen in their nest in June.

Eagles remain with the same mate until one of them dies, and pairs will often use the same nest year after year. Over time, nests become enormous — some have been as big as 9 feet in diameter and weighed up to 2 tons.

Because the birds are likely to return to their nests, Berry College recently installed two cameras in the pine tree. The birds returned, which is a good sign they the will lay eggs in the tree this fall.

The cameras went live on Sept. 18, and can be seen at berry.edu/eaglecam. Regular updates about the birds can be found on the Berry College Eagles Facebook page.

Bald eagles' return from 417 pairs in 1963 to more than 10,000 pairs today is one of the world's great conservation success stories. In 2007, the Center for Biological Diversity conducted a census of the nation's bald eagles and found about 11,040 pairs. See the map below to find out how many were in your state.

bald eagle map

Photo: Suckling, K. and W. Hodges. Center for Biological Diversity, Tucson, AZ

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