After landing at JFK yesterday evening (I've never seen so many planes waiting on the tarmac — I counted about 27 as we made our final approach), I jumped on the subway to get back to my boyfriend's apartment in the Flatiron District just before the subway shut down at 7 p.m. I knew that Hurricane Sandy was on its way and was feeling pretty grateful that my travel timing to and from Mexico allowed me to get home without incident. 


I arrived on 16th Street to find my boyfriend well-prepared, with some cans of Amy's organic soups and Kind Bars (as well as hard-boiled eggs) to keep us fed just in case we lost power for a long time. (We also ordered extra food, including some salads, from Hollywood Diner, which is a neighborhood stalwart that usually never closes.) And thinking smartly — not to mention less wastefully — my boyfriend didn't buy bottled water, but instead filtered and stored tapwater in a bunch of available containers. We also filled a bucket for washing, etc. 

This morning we took a walk to get coffee at the sole cafe that was still open, and felt the really intense winds start to gust as we returned to the apartment; we checked out all the preparations that the city was making on our ramble. 

At Union Square, several firetrucks were moving positions in preparation for the storm. 

This area of Union Square is usually a large open plaza, but not on this day, when city vehicles and Con Ed trucks waited for deployment in preparation for Hurricane Sandy. 

More Con Ed trucks at Union Square ready to go when needed. Widespread power outages are expected Monday evening and into Tuesday. 

All the subways closed at 7 p.m. last night, and the closures will continue through today and probably at least through tomorrow morning. 

A Con Ed mobile command unit in Union Square. 

Most supermarkets, drug stores and other businesses are closed today; this sign is from Whole Foods in Union Square. 

Pretty much the only traffic on NYC streets were taxis, city vehicles and Con Ed trucks. Note how cloudy the Empire State Building looks in the background as Hurricane Sandy moves into NYC. 


Related on MNN: What hurricanes look like from NASA's point of view


The opinions expressed by MNN Bloggers and those providing comments are theirs alone, and do not reflect the opinions of While we have reviewed their content to make sure it complies with our Terms and Conditions, MNN is not responsible for the accuracy of any of their information.