In case hydraulic fracking hasn’t been getting enough attention recently, the National Baseball Hall of Fame has decided to weigh in.

The hall of fame, based in Cooperstown, decided to support the Cooperstown Chamber of Commerce’s recent resolution opposing hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking” as it is commonly known. Fracking is a controversial method used by the natural gas industry where rig operators pump a mixture of water, sand and secret chemicals into the ground to extract isolated pockets of natural gas.

Cooperstown is located in central New York, in the heart of the of the gas-rich Marcellus Shale region. The sleepy town is a picturesque tourist destination for baseball fans around the world, and is even a growing retirement community.

A full transcript of the hall’s opposition to fracking was reprinted online over at pressconnect.com, and can be read below. The statement isn’t nearly as strong as the hall’s opposition to Pete Rose, but as far as I can tell, the natural gas has never bet on baseball.

Here’s the statement:

“As a member of the Cooperstown Chamber of Commerce, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum supports the Chamber’s recent resolution that hydrofracking for shale gas in Otsego County could cause serious damage to the qualities that make Cooperstown a world-renowned tourist destination and a unique community.

The Hall of Fame is an internationally-renowned tourist destination whose brand is fully synonymous with Cooperstown.  As an American treasure, and the cornerstone to this region since 1939, the Museum and county would undoubtedly suffer repercussions in the event of problems from hydrofracking – or even the perception thereof. The natural beauty and quality of life are the essence of Cooperstown.  Tourists, who view Cooperstown as a pristine and pastoral escape, would unquestionably consider other destinations unspoiled by the harmful ecological impact of hydrofracking.  A significant drop in visitorship could severely impact the Hall of Fame on many fronts, from day-to-day operations to staffing levels, while also leading to a significant decrease in tourism-related revenue for the village, county and state. 

Like the Chamber of Commerce and virtually every other area business, the Museum concludes that hydrofracking could present an unacceptable risk to the local environment, the economy and the quality of life for both local residents and tourists. As such, we believe that much more complete research and an understanding of the long-term impact of gas exploration and extraction is needed.”

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