Leopard

Photo: Casey Anderson, Host/Executive Producer, National Geographic/Nat Geo Wild

National Geographic is known for its world-renowned nature photography, and now the organization is calling for everyone to pick up their cameras and snap a picture of nearby nature with The Great Nature Project.

In inviting people of all ages from all over the world to contribute, Nat Geo hopes to break the Guiness World Records title for the largest online collection of animals. Here are some of the cream of the crop from some of Nat Geo's best photographers.

If you'd like to get involved, it's as easy as uploading your photo to Flickr, Instagram, Twitter, National Geographic Your Shot, Facebook, or any photo sharing site, and tagging #GreatNature. Be sure to tag #animal to help Nat Geo break their record!

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Grizzly bear on the hunt

Photo: Casey Anderson, Host/Executive Producer, National Geographic/Nat Geo Wild


In this photo taken by Casey Anderson, a grizzly bear stalks elk calves in Yellowstone National Park. Anderson is the author of "The Story of Brutus: My life with Brutus the Bear and Grizzlies of North America."

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Snake

Photo: Krithi Karanth, Conservation Biologist, National Geographic Emerging Explorer

 
Biologists have submitted their photographs as well. Krithi Karanth, of the Centre for Wildlife Studies, snapped a striking photograph of a cat snake in Western Ghats.
 
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Sunlight through longleaf pine trees

Photo: Carlton Ward Jr., National Geographic grantee

Carlton Ward Jr. has worked on the Florida Wildlife Corridor collaboration to protect the ecosystem that ranges throughout Florida. Ward trekked from the Everglades to Okefenokee Natinoal Wildlife Refuge and photographed these wonders along the way.

Here, the sun rises behind a longleaf pine forest in the Everglades.

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Bear covered in mud

Photo: Carlton Ward Jr., National Geographic grantee

 
This bear was part of what inspired Ward's expedition. Ward also traveled with a bear biologist, Joe Guthrie.
 
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Giraffe walking at sunset

Photo: Beverly Joubert, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence

Beverly Joubert, co-founder of the Big Cats initiative, captures photographs of the vulnerable African wilderness. 

This photograph, which is essentially the real-life version of the opening of Lion King, shows a girarffe in the Mara Plains.

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Wildebeests stampeding

Photo: Beverly Joubert, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence

Joubert's photos continue along the "Lion King" theme with an amazing photograph of a wildebeest stampede. Its artistic qualities prove why Joubert is an award-winning filmmaker.

 
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Anna Norris is an associate editor at Mother Nature Network. Follow her on Twitter and Google+.
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