This year's dead zone in the Chesapeake Bay could be the largest on record thanks to elevated levels of fertilizers and other chemicals. In June, the dead zone stretched 83 miles, or about a third of the bay, and has only grown larger since then.

Dead zones are created when chemical nutrients from runoff fuels abnormally high algae growth. When the algae dies, their decomposing bodies suck up all the oxygen from the water which kills anything that can't move out of the area.

It makes me sick just thinking about it-- we've completely wiped out all life in almost half of the Chesapeake Bay, one of the most important spawning grounds in the world. On top of that, we are also responsible for massive dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico, in the Baltic Sea, and the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

It's not looking good for the oceans.

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