A Southern California super bloom so prolific it could be seen from space has been killed off by a last gasp from old man winter.

While many of the spectacular species of wildflowers, from Arizona lupine to desert lilies, were already on the wane, a freak snowstorm that blew through the state on May 7 finished the job. In San Diego, the city recorded its coldest day in 64 years with a high of "only" 59 degrees. Nearby Palomar Mountain, where blooms were still heavy with color, recorded a record 10 inches of snowfall.

“This is basically a winter storm that happens to be occurring in May,” James Brotherton, a weather service forecaster, told the San Diego Tribune. “There’s snow in the mountains, rain everywhere else, and cold air.”

Sicco Rood, a research associate at the Anza-Borrego Desert Research Center, captured some photos Sunday on Cuyamaca Peak, which received an average of one foot of snow from the storm.

A scene of the unexpected winter wonderland on Cuyamaca Peak.
A scene of the unexpected winter wonderland on Cuyamaca Peak. (Photo: Sicco Rood/Anza-Borrego DRC)
A frozen bloom on Cuyamaca Peak.
A frozen bloom on Cuyamaca Peak. (Photo: Sicco Rood/Anza-Borrego DRC)
Some of the last portions of the California super bloom have been encased in ice.
Some of the last portions of the California super bloom have been encased in ice. (Photo: Sicco Rood/Anza-Borrego DRC)
Some flowers managed to escape the brunt of the icy blast.
Some flowers managed to escape the brunt of the icy blast. (Photo: Sicco Rood/Anza-Borrego DRC)
Cuyamaca Peak, San Diego County, snow in May
Cuyamaca Peak in San Diego County received an average of 12 inches of fresh snow on May 7. (Photo: Sicco Rood/Anza-Borrego DRC)