What if your baby's diaper could give you instant information about her health?  Is she dehydrated?  Are her kidneys functioning properly?  Should she be tested for diabetes?  

Well, guess what? Now it can.

I'm not talking about diapers that "just" tell you whether your baby's diaper is dirty.  That is the work of technology like the Huggies TweetPee app.  Rather, I'm talking about "smart" diapers that analyze your baby's urine and let you know with a quick scan from your smartphone how she is feeling.

The new Smart Diapers -- from Pixie Scientific -- are the brainchild of two parents, Jennie Rubinshteyn and Yaroslav Faybishenko, who had an epiphany one day about 18 months ago when their then one year old daughter would not stop crying.  "I was being paranoid. I couldn't stop asking myself and my husband, 'What is in her diaper? What's in her diaper?" Rubinshteyn, told ABC News. Faybishenko responded, "Data is her diaper. Urine is full of so much health information."

So the husband-wife team set to work creating a disposable diaper with an added feature - the ability to analyze a baby's urine.  The diapers look like your average disposable model but with a QR code looking square on the front.  Once a day, parents can scan the square and upload info about their baby's urine.  According to Rubinshteyn and Faybishenko, the goal is to accumulate data about urination patterns and then use that data to pick up on urinary tract infections, dehydration, developing kidney problems, or even diabetes.

The couple is hoping to test their smart diapers at a few pediatric hospitals this fall and hopefully submit it to the FDA for final approval after that.

According to Faybishenko, when they do hit the market, Smart Diapers will be 30 to 40 percent more expensive than regular diapers. 

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