You may not believe your astrological sign has any merit when it comes to personality, but a recent study finds that the time of year you're born can affect your temperament.

Hungarian researchers matched 400 people's personality type to the month they were born and found that people born at certain times of year have a greater chance of developing certain temperaments.

For example, if you're celebrating a birthday this fall, research shows you're less likely to suffer from depression. However, if you were born during the summer months, you're more likely to experience mood swings.

Scientists also found that people with spring or summer birthdays tend to be more positive, while those born in winter are more irritable adults than those born in other seasons.

"Basically, it seems that when you are born may increase or decrease your chance of developing certain mood disorders," lead researcher, Xenia Gonda, told The Telegraph.

Why would the season of your birth affect your personality?

Scientists say it may be because seasons have an influence on certain neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and dopamine.

When serotonin levels drop, people can become anxious, irritable or depressed. Antidepressants like Prozac and Zoloft work by increasing serotonin levels.

Dopamine is another mood-enhancer, and elevated levels tend to make people more confident, euphoric and hyperactive.

However, Gonda says birth season also reflects differences in several environmental factors such as available nutrients, a mother's level of physical activity, types of pathogens and light exposure.

All of these influences play a role in nervous-system development.

Gonda also points out that there could be an even simpler explanation: Certain times of year are simply more popular for babymaking.

"Season influences how likely parents are to procreate," she told Yahoo.

For example, people with seasonal affective disorder may be less likely to engage in sexual activity during cold months because they're feeling down.

Because of this, people at risk for developing seasonal affective disorder are less likely to be born during autumn.

"So there may be both environmental and genetic reasons," Gonda said.

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