Last year, Cameron Cohen had an injury that had him down and out of sports and activities for a few months. During that time, Cameron started learning about computers. According to his father, he was reading "anything he could get his hands on" on the topic and even watching Stanford University professors on iTunes and scouring the Web for articles on programming. The result? The 11-year-old taught himself several different programming languages and decided to write his very own iPhone app.  

This kid didn’t just teach himself how to program; he also managed to get his app approved by Apple, something many adults can’t seem to manage. The app, which is a painting/drawing program, was approved by Apple for sale on its App Store in December.

The app, iSketch, is a drawing and painting program that lets you choose brushes and colors, and lets you send your drawings to friends via e-mail.

The best part of the story is not just that Cameron is wicked smart, or that he made lemonade out of lemons when he couldn't get play sports. The best part is that Cameron hasn't forgotten all of the help he received in recovering from his injury, and he’s donating some of the proceeds from the sale of iSketch to the children’s hospital that helped him.

"Inspired by the care I received at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center and Orthopaedic Hospital, I have dedicated a portion of the proceeds from the sales of iSketch to purchase entertainment and electronic items for Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA’s Child Life/Child Development programs in Westwood and Santa Monica so that pre-teens and teens will have additional age-appropriate options available to them during their hospital stays," says Cameron in a statement on his Website, CCC Development.

The iSketch app sells for 99-cents in the iTunes store.  

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