Bill Nye — scientist, engineer, comedian, author and inventor — is best known as the guy behind the television program "Bill Nye the Science Guy," though soon he may be better known for his new YouTube video. Posted on Aug. 23 for big think, “Bill Nye: Creationism Is Not Appropriate For Children” has already attracted nearly 1.2 million viewers.

 

"Denial of evolution is unique to the United States," he begins in the video, "When you have a portion of the population that doesn't believe in that, it holds everybody back, really.”

 

“Evolution is the fundamental idea in all of life science, in all of biology,” he continues. “It's like, it's very much analogous to trying to do geology without believing in tectonic plates. You're just not going to get the right answer.”

 

So where does the United States, the “most advanced technological” country, stand when it comes to the theory that God created Adam and Eve, the world, and everything in it in six days? The Gallup Poll released its latest findings in June, which reveal that 46 percent of Americans believe in creationism, 32 percent believed in God-guided evolution, and 15 percent believe in atheistic evolution.

 

"The idea of deep time of billions of years explains so much of the world around us. If you try to ignore that, your worldview becomes crazy, untenable, itself inconsistent," Nye said in the video.

 

"I say to the grownups, if you want to deny evolution and live in your world, that's completely inconsistent with the world we observe, that's fine. But don't make your kids do it — because we need them. We need scientifically literate voters and taxpayers for the future. We need engineers that can build stuff and solve problems," he said.

 

As CNN notes, the tenets of creationism have been negated by the mainstream scientific community ever since Darwin’s "The Origin of Species" was published in 1859. By 1880, The American Naturalists, a science journal, reported nearly every major university in America was teaching evolution. Yet here we are.

 

“You know, in another couple of centuries that world view [creationism]… it just won't exist," he concludes,  "There's no evidence for it ..."