Looking for Earth Day activities for kids?

The best way to start would be to check out the schedule of Earth Day festivals in your area. From tree plantings to river cleanups to nature-themed games and crafts, they are lots of fun things organized for kids each year on Earth Day.

If you happen to be a teacher, it’s easier than ever to include Earth Day activities and lesson plans into your class. We have listed links to a few of them below.

If you’re just looking for a quiet family activity for Earth Day, consider these projects:

  • Plan a garden and see how food and flowers grow. It’s an excellent way to help children see connections between their lives, their food and the land around them.
  • Consider adopting an endangered right whale, or a polar bear.
  • Learn about birds by setting up a bird feeder and investing in a bird book and a pair of binoculars. You could also take the kids on a bird walk.
  • Hike in a local national park. The National Park Foundation has an online tool to find parks near you.
  • Visit a local sustainable farm that raises animals. Let the children watch the milking and the egg collecting, let them smell the barns and see the hay bales.
  • Create a composting system for your home. If you live in the city, consider worm composting.
  • Make nature or trash crafts. Learn more about these kids’ activities on MNN’s the best Earth Day craft links.
Still not sure what you’re going to do? Well, here are a few sites with great ideas for Earth Day activities for kids:
  • PlanetPals.com is an excellent resource for everything related to children and Earth Day. For starters, kids can enter the 2010 Earth Day Contest by submitting a short video that depicts how they have helped the planet. The site also contains a learning section that covers issues about weather, natural disasters, recycling, precycling, endangered species, ozone holes and more. There are also quizzes and free clip art.
  • The Environmental Kids Club, developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, features several interactive games and animations that help kids learn about plants, animals, water, air, garbage and recycling. In addition, kids can enjoy online coloring books and find information on the President’s Environmental Youth Award.
  • Earth Day House Hunt, produced by Time for Kids, helps children understand what could harm or help the environment in your own home. 
  • Over at The Earth Day Network, they’ve posted several lesson plans designed to teach children about ecology, natural resources, water, forests and even Henry David Thoreau. 
  • On the Kaboose site, there’s a compilation of Earth Day songs you can learn to sing with the kids. The page has 24 songs listed along with links to information about the albums and to the various artists' Web pages.
Sounds like a lot to pick through? You’re right. There are so many Earth Day activities for kids you may need to save some for next year. See you then.