In a world dominated by blonde, brunette and raven-haired folks, those with red hair have often found themselves to be in the minority, and sometimes, the butt of the joke. That’s one of the many reasons why redheads, many of whom feel like they are members of an awesome exclusive club, enjoy getting together to celebrate their gene pool.

There was a ginger pride march in Edinburgh, Scotland, another in Melbourne, Australia, a redhead festival in Holland, and London has its own redhead day coming up in September. Now, ginger pride is coming to Plymouth, England.

Stuart Parry, a redhead by birth, is organizing a gathering for ginger pride in the summer of 2016. He wrote on the gathering’s Facebook page , “Inspired by events in Holland and Edinburgh, we intend to organise a 'Ginger Pride' gathering in the South West of England. This is being done, not for political status or because we have a chip on our shoulder, but because it will be FUN!”

Parry hopes that being made fun of for being ginger is fast becoming a thing of the past, and that events like these help to bring people together to celebrate something that more and more are seeing as positive rather than negative.

"I wonder if we're approaching a time when bullying gingers is over," Parry told the Plymouth Herald . “Being ginger has stopped being uncool, and people are seeing more and more positives about being a redhead."

It’s been estimated that roughly 1 to 2 percent of the population is adorned with (natural) red locks with the largest number thought to reside in the United States. No word on how many are red with the help of a bottle. That means that the world has somewhere between 70 and 140 million gingers. Some of the most famous ones include England’s Prince Harry, actors Julianne Moore, Seth Green, Karen Gillan, Jessica Chastain and Nicole Kidman, singer Ed Sheeran, and painter Vincent Van Gogh.

The interest for the event seems to be there. On June 17 there were 700 “likes” on the Facebook page. Now, just over two weeks later there are more than 5,300 people, presumably many of them ginger, who are fans of the page.

“It's going to be a [celebration] for people to see we're not quite as weird as you all thought. It's not going to be a 'we're gingers, we're different' event, we already know that, it's just a celebration," Parry told the Herald. "The only thing we have in common is our hair colour, but that gives us shared experiences."

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