The worst part about visiting an animal shelter is seeing all of those animals in cages. Even if there's a room to stretch out and maybe a blanket or a bed inside, it's hard to see those sad little furbabies behind bars. That's exactly why one Oregon shelter is doing away with the bars and giving their pups cottages instead, to help them feel more at home while they wait for their forever families.

Luvable dog shelter cottage 'You had me at woof.' (Photo: Luvable Dog Rescue)

At the Luvable Dog Rescue in Eugene, Oregon, each dog has his or her own little cottage, complete with cozy furniture, paintings, and other necessities that make the rooms look like a home. The cottages offer the pups a home-like environment that minimizes stress while they wait to be adopted. They also have the benefit of allowing the rescue center staff to see exactly how the dog behaves in a home environment, which gives them more information to pass on to potential adopters about each dog's likes, dislikes and temperament.

Luvable dog shelter cottage The interiors of the dog cottages are decorated to help the dogs feel more at home. (Photo: Luvable Dog Rescue)

The cottages aren't the only puppy perk at Luvable Dog Rescue. The rescue center sits on 55 acres of land that includes forests, meadows, and hiking trails for the dogs to get their exercise.

Liesl Wilhardt, executive director of Luvable Dog Rescue, told PupJournal that she has always been drawn to pit bulls, even as a young girl. She started off by fostering pit bulls and over the years began turning her hobby into a full-time career with a mission to give all dogs the special lives they deserve. In addition to the cottages, Wilhardt recently built a “pit bull palace” for bigger dogs, and she hopes to build a maternity ward for doggie moms to share with their newborns.

Luvable dog shelter cottage The cottages offer the dogs stress-free places to relax while they wait for their forever homes. (Photo: Luvable Dog Rescue)

Wilhardt said the goal of Luvable Dog Rescue is to make each dog's stay as comfortable and stress-free as possible. She hopes that "those who have lost their families, or 'pack,' or have never had one, can finally feel a sense of belonging there."