If we live long enough, we'll all eventually need a little extra help getting around. Ike, a 15 1/2-year-old rescue dog in Hawthorne, California, is no exception.

After the elderly pooch was diagnosed with bone cancer, his veterinarian gave him two to six months to live. Luckily for Ike, Risa Feldman, the guardian who adopted him 12 years ago, wanted to make his last few months on Earth happy ones.

Feldman had to think outside the box to give Ike the quality of life that anyone would want when facing a terminal illness. His cancer causes him a great deal of pain in his hind legs, making it challenging for him to go for walks. ABC News reports that Feldman had been helping him along by lifting his back legs with a harness. Ike isn’t exactly a small dog, so that was no easy task. Ike even has a wheelchair, but at his age and in his condition, using it tuckers him out.

Not wanting to give up on Ike, Feldman went to her local Home Depot in search of another solution. She wanted to get him a little wagon that he could lie in as she pulled him around. Ike would be able to rest his hind legs and still see the world.

She originally grabbed a hand cart and asked Ernesto Moran, a Home Depot employee, how she could adapt it to make it usable for Ike. Feldman recalls her first conversation with Moran, “I showed him the cart that I was trying to use and I asked him, ‘What can I do to change this cart and build it so that it’s longer or his size?’ He just shook his head and said, ‘Let me give it some thought and I’ll call you later.'"

The kindhearted Moran gave Feldman more than a phone call. Teaming up with his coworker, Justin Wadman, the two designed and built a custom-made wagon just for Ike. They even installed a ramp so the elderly pup could more easily climb in. And best of all, they didn’t charge her for it.

Moran told KABC, “I offered to build this for her and let her know that it’s something that Home Depot offers — giving back to our customers.”

Feldman was so appreciative that she went to the news, explaining, “I just wanted people to know that there are still people out there who do good things, really.”

Now, Ike can rest easy on his new mobile cushion as he looks around and smells the fresh air. Because of Feldman's devotion and the kindness of Moran and Wadman, Ike’s final months will be less painful, and a lot more joyful.

Feldman said, "He's so happy to watch everybody. It's his favorite thing to do. He'll lay there in the sun."

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