The American Kennel Club just recognized a hairless terrier and a North African hound as the newest members of the group's exclusive club.

The American hairless terrier and the sloughi have joined the AKC's 187 other recognized breeds. They are immediately eligible to compete in the AKC's shows, but won't be able to strut their stuff for the renowned Westminster Kennel Club dog show this February. They'll have to wail until next year.

“We’re excited to welcome these two unique breeds into the AKC family,” said AKC Vice President Gina DiNardo. “Both breeds make wonderful companions for the right family."


sloughiThe sleek, reserved sloughi is also known as the Arabian greyhound. (Photo: American Kennel Club)

The sloughi (pronounced SLOO-ghee), also known as the Arabian greyhound, is a medium-sized, high-energy dog, according to the AKC. The smooth-coated, athletic breed was developed in North Africa to hunt game such as wild pigs and gazelles. The AKC says, "The breed is noble and somewhat reserved, with a gentle, melancholy expression." Because sloughis will chase after everything, the AKC cautions that they must be kept on a leash or in a fenced yard.

American hairless terrier

American hairless terrier puppyOriginally bred to hunt vermin, American hairless terriers now excel in sporting events. (Photo: Olena Zaskochenko/Shutterstock)

The American hairless terrier is a small, active dog that comes hairless, as the name implies, or with a very short coat, but still carries the hairless gene. That can make them a good choice for people with allergies to pet hair. Originally bred to hunt rats and other vermin, the breed today often does well in many sporting events, according to the AKC. The organization describes the breed as "energetic, alert, curious and intelligent."

For a breed to be eligible for AKC recognition, there must be a minimum number of dogs in the U.S., as well as an active, established breed club of owners and breeders.

Mary Jo DiLonardo Mary Jo writes about everything from health to parenting — and anything that helps explain why her dog does what he does.