Last night, my mom came over for dinner. When I was deciding what to make, I looked out my window and saw an abundance of chives growing in the window and instantly chives became what I would base the meal on.  I remembered that I wrote a 5 recipes for chives post a while back, so I hunted it down.

Bear with me, this story is leading to my weekend wine pick.

I chose one of those 5 recipes, Sauteed Chicken Breast with Creamy Chive Sauce, to make for dinner. (It’s a keeper, by the way.) The recipe calls for white wine in the sauce. I didn’t have any in the house so I ran to the local liquor store.

I chose Dreaming Tree Everyday White Wine, a wine from musician Dave Matthews and his partner, veteran winemaker Steve Reeder. Last summer, a friend and I drank our share of Dreaming Tree’s Crush (a red blend) on week-long visit, but I hadn’t tried any of the winery’s other varietals.

Everyday White Wine is “blended from select aromatic varietals that thrive in the central coast of vineyards of Monterey County.” It’s a blend of Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Viognier, and Albarino. The sweetness of the Riesling and Gewurztraminer are evident, but it’s not what I would specifically label a “sweet” wine.

This crisp wine starts out citrusy and ends with fruit flavors. I preferred it more chilled than when I first brought it home right from the store’s refrigerator. I poured what I needed for the recipe in to a measuring cup and then a little for myself and it wasn’t quite cold enough. By the time dinner rolled around, it was plenty chilled and very refreshing on a warm evening.

It is definitely what I would call a summer wine. To me, a summer wine is one that can be enjoyed by itself without any food to complement it, and I can picture myself sitting on the top deck of a beach house, drinking it early in the evening as I watch the waves crash.

How did it work in the recipe? Very nicely. A great thing about cooking with wine is that whatever wine you cooked is almost a safe bet to drink with the meal.

Their website has information on Dreaming Tree’s sustainability efforts and the fact that the environment is important to them. There’s a bit of a vague “sustainable farming practices” claim, and the details about the sustainability lie in the packaging information. Their bottles are 25 percent lighter than regular wine bottles, the labels are made from 100 percent recycled kraft brown paper, and of course, their bottles and corks are recyclable.

All of the Dreaming Tree wines retail for about $15 a bottle. 

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