It’s Friday afternoon, and that means it’s time for me to give you a little weekend reading from around the Web. Here are a few food-related items that might interest you.

 

I finally had the chance to see “Eat Pray Love” earlier this week. I have mixed feelings about the movie, but I absolutely loved the focus on food. Saveur has a photo gallery of 21 movies that make you want to cook and a recipe inspired by each movie including Cacio e Pepe Pasta Sauce inspired by “Eat Pray Love.”

As Eat Pray Love author Elizabeth Gilbert says, "Italians take every ingredient they know and make a feast of it." According to her, "there are few ways to create happiness more efficiently than by cooking for yourself and others." In honor of the movie staring Julia Roberts, we chose perhaps one of the most famous simple Roman pasta sauces, made with black pepper and aged Pecorino Romano. It is sure to restore your appetite for life! Buon appetito. 
Click here for the full photo gallery and recipes.

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The New York Times discusses the debate over chocolate milk in schools. Some schools have banned the flavored milk that has as much sugar as most sodas, while others see it as a way to get needed nutrients into students.

MILK, that icon of purity, has been taking some hits lately.

 

By the time they are 11, children drink more soda than milk. The amount of milk consumed in America over all has fallen to about 20 gallons a year per capita, from 25 gallons in the early 1990s.

Click here for the full story.

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Indy Week has a thoughtful piece about Feminists who can – as in can tomatoes.

For Shana Starobin, downtime means baking bread, knitting and crocheting, picking and canning fruit, doing woodwork or tending vegetables on her rooftop garden in Durham.

 

Starobin, a 32-year-old doctoral candidate at the Duke University Nicholas School of the Environment, sees her favorite do-it-yourself pastimes as more than hobbies, though.

 

"I feel, as a woman, so empowered to be able to learn how to do these things," she says. "They're kind of lost skills."

Click here for the full piece.

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I’ll be getting out in the garden sometime next week and planting my fall crops. What can you plant in fall? We’ve got a slideshow with tips on 17 different vegetables to grow during fall that will keep on coming long after your last tomato has been eaten.

 

Enjoy your weekend!

 

Image: Matt Callow 

Robin Shreeves ( @rshreeves ) focuses on food from a family perspective from her home base in New Jersey.