It’s Friday afternoon, and that means it’s time for me to give you a little weekend reading from around the web. Here are a few food related items that I thought might interest you.

If you want to smack your head against your desk in frustration, go ahead and read this piece from the Chicago Tribune about the food that Chicago Public schools grow in their school gardens. You’d think the students would be allowed to eat it, wouldn’t you?

It's harvest time in Chicago Public School gardens full of chubby tomatoes, heavy squash and fragrant basil.

These urban oases, carefully tended by teachers, students and volunteers, range from several square feet to several acres of fruits, vegetables, herbs and flowers, and some schools even grow plants year-round in school greenhouses.

Click here for the full piece.

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Does a free breakfast factor into your hotel choice? It absolutely factors into my family’s choice if we’re traveling with the boys. If it’s just my husband and me, it’s not something I’m concerned with. According to CNN, seventy percent of leisure travelers take that free hotel breakfast into consideration.

To ensure a happy hotel guest, offer excellent service, provide a comfortable bed and never, ever underestimate the power of a free bagel: After a good night's sleep, many travelers these days are expecting -- and receiving -- a good breakfast. 
Click here for the full piece.

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Do you ever wonder which beers are the least fattening? The Daily Beast has done the work for you in figuring out which 50 beers will put the least amount of weight on your based on their calorie and carbohydrate count.

As study after study has proven, drinking in moderation has proven health benefits. One drink a day for women or two for men can prevent diabetes, arthritis, arteriosclerosis and certain types of cancer. The hops, barley and yeast used to make beer also contains soluble fiber, probiotics and antioxidants.
Click here for the full piece.
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Does how you pay for food make a difference in the food you choose? Time reports on a study that found that those that pay for their groceries with cash are more apt to buy healthier food than those that paid with credit cards.


Paying with cash instead of plastic at the grocery store leads to more careful spending and healthier food choices, a study in the Journal of Consumer Research finds.

The idea is that shelling out actual money is psychologically more difficult than swiping a credit card, which takes away from the joy of spending.

Click here for the full piece.

Enjoy your weekend!

Image: Matt Callow

  

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