It’s Friday afternoon, and that means it’s time for me to give you a little weekend reading from around the Web. Here are a few food related items that I thought might interest you.

This is only slightly related to food only because something really great was found in Bing Crosby’s wine cellar, but for baseball fans, it’s really a find. Thought I’d share it with you.

How a near pristine black-and-white reel of the entire television broadcast of the deciding game of the 1960 World Series — long believed to be lost forever — came to rest in the dry and cool wine cellar of Bing Crosby’s home near San Francisco is not a mystery to those who knew him.
Click here for the full story.

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Diners in New York City recently paid $85 a piece for a gourmet dinner. That price might sound pretty good for a full course meal in NYC, but this meal was created from bugs.

SOMETHING happened when Kisha Moorehead looked into the bowl of live worms.

She was midway through a five-course Mexican feast at the Brooklyn Kitchen in Williamsburg last Saturday night, a meal engineered to introduce New Yorkers to the succulent wonders of edible insects. Throughout the first couple of courses (yucca frites dotted with mealworms, a smoked corn custard sprinkled with crispy moth larvae), Ms. Moorehead’s response had been muted. Earlier that evening, in fact, out on the sidewalk, she and her date, Harold Bradley, had considered fleeing the event altogether, even though they’d spent $85 each.

Click here for the full story.

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The carrots from the sexy carrot adds in the packages that make them look more like Cheetos than health food are starting to hit school vending machines. Are students buying them?

A school in Ohio has installed an "all carrot vending machine," reports the Middletown Journal, or more precisely, an all baby-carrot vending machine. The machine was installed by Bolthouse Farms, one of the nation's leading grower of baby carrots (which aren't really "babies" at all, but are usually made from blemished or otherwise "rejected" carrots) and one of the farms involved with the national marketing campaign. Bolthouse also put one in a Syracuse, N.Y. school, stocked with 300 bags of baby carrots at 50 cents a bag.
Click here for the full story.

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Remember when I told you that Gourmet was going to be resurrected as an iPad app. The free app, Gourmet Live, is now available and Folio takes a look at it.

Back in June, Condé Nast said it planned to bring back the Gourmet brand as "Gourmet Live," a digital product developed in HTML5 that would be available across multiple devices and platforms. And it delivered. The innovative app for the iPad hit Apple’s iTunes store today. Chock full of stories from the magazine (which Condé closed down last fall), recipes, videos and slideshows, Gourmet Live is free and content is available without registration. 
Click here for the full story.

Enjoy your weekend!

Photo: Matt Callow/Flickr 

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