It’s Friday afternoon, and that means it’s time for me to give you a little weekend reading from around the web. Here are a few food related items that I thought might interest you.

Twilight Earth reports that for the first time since the early ‘90’s not only did the sales of bottle water not increase last year, they fell. This is great environmental news.

Environmentalist efforts, a sagging economy and major cities outlawing the sales of bottle water, have contributed to a drop in sales.
Click here to read the full story.

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Chow has 10 different way for you to barter for food. In this economy, this is a must read.

Bartering saves money, keeps food local (and seasonal), and allows you to meet neighbors and build community. Here are some of the ways people are trading food, what they’re sharing, and advice about getting involved without getting in trouble (bartering is considered taxable by the IRS, and you don’t want to violate agricultural laws or quarantines that might be in effect in your area).
Click here to read the full story.

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Earlier this week, the ever thorough La Vida Locavore blog brought it to my attention that governors in several pork producing states were asking the USDA for a $50,000 pork bailout. She followed that up with the news that the USDA said, “no.”

Following up on the request by nine governors and pork industry giants for the U.S. Department of Agriculture to spend $50 million on excess pork products, Radio Iowa reported on Tuesday that the USDA can't help right now:
Click here to read the full story.

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Finally, MNN’s home blogger Matt has some information on a contest for those of you engaged in “full-frontal gardening.”

Everyone’s got a backyard garden (well, not everyone but you know what I mean). Front yard gardens, however, are a rarer breed. Out front, most homeowners opt for manicured grass lawns and polite flowerbeds while out back, shielded from the eyes (and hands) of the general public, edible gardens are allowed to grow wild. Domestic gardening habits, in a way, are akin to the mullet hairstyle: “Business up front, party in the back.”
Click here to read the full story.

Enjoy your weekend!

Image: Matt Callow

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