It’s Friday afternoon, and that means it’s time for me to give you a little weekend reading from around the web. Here are a few food related items that I thought might interest you.

A Young Reader’s Edition of Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma has been published. Slow Food USA has a review of the book.

The Young Reader’s Edition of Michael Pollan’s bestselling exposé, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, is a lot like the original. Both books contain most of the same information, but the way in which this information is presented changes the book radically. The main difference is that the writing style (and I won’t say it has been dumbed-down) in the Young Reader’s Edition is a lot more blunt about Pollan’s ideas.  The whole thing only took a few hours to read, whereas the original took a couple of weeks.
Click here to read the full review.

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The Packer has an interesting piece on how those who ship produce far distances are trying to combat the Buy Local movement.

Consumers are infatuated with the local food movement, but a leading produce economist believes commercial fruit and vegetable shippers who ship food across the U.S. and the world must be ready to make the case for their produce in the court of public opinion.

While purchases of local food now are "fragmented and intermittent" and may make up only about 1% of U.S. food sales, Desmond O'Rourke, president of Belrose Inc., Pullan, Wash., said the movement is a significant trend that could shift suppliers' market share.

Click here to read the full story.

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I love this piece from Boston.com about how kids don’t want what is on the typical kids’ menu at a restaurant. I know my boys don’t.

Oliver Bentley is 8 years old. His sister, Anna, is 6. At Zenna Noodle Bar in Brookline, the two are waiting for their Asian noodle soups to arrive. In the meantime, they’re eating fresh rolls with peanut sauce and clams. “They’re interested in food,’’ says their father, Chris. They like sushi, Mexican, and Italian. Anna loves lox, and she’ll often have capers as a snack. As a baby, Oliver adored baba ghanoush. 
Click here to read the full story.

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We’ve got a piece here on MNN about how some red wine and balsamic vinegars have levels of lead in them to be concerned about.

Experts say consuming balsamic and red wine vinegars may pose a health risk, especially to children, because vinegars have been found to contain small amounts of lead, according to a recent story in Environmental Health News.
Click here to read the full story.

Image: Matt Callow

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