We absolutely love it when a study comes out that says chocolate is good for us, don’t we? When a study says that chocolate may make us slimmer or chocolate eaters may have fewer strokes, many of us suddenly get very interested in scientific research. Of course, it usually comes out in those studies that those who eat dark chocolate, usually 70 percent cacao or higher, get the most health benefits.

 

The latest study to have us all reaching for the dark chocolate comes from San Diego State University, and this study studied the benefits of dark chocolate vs. white chocolate.

 

Thirty-one people ate chocolate daily for 15 days. Some were given 50 grams (about 1.7 ounces) of dark chocolate daily. Some were given 50 grams of white chocolate daily. During the experiment, they all had their blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar monitored. Those who were given dark chocolate had more positive results, especially with heart health, than those that were given the white chocolate.

 

They found that those who ate either form of dark chocolate had lower blood sugar levels and better cholesterol ratios, more “good” cholesterol or HDL, and less “bad” cholesterol, or LDL, compared to the white chocolate group.
 

Of course, chocolate isn’t the only food that’s able to help with heart health. The flavonoids in the dark chocolate that benefit heart health are found in most fruits and vegetables as well as many dried beans and grains.

 

Eating a healthy diet of these whole foods can provide you with plenty of flavonoids, but if you enjoy a daily dose of chocolate, make it a small amount of dark chocolate to add to your heart health. Here are a few suggestions that MNN writers, including me, have had in the past.

 

 

What’s your favorite way to get in a little dark chocolate regularly?

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