Irish brown bread
 

When I was in Ireland, I ate a lot of soup and Irish brown bread. It was an inexpensive meal option, the soups were always good and the bread was fantastic. Whether we were in a small pub or a more upscale restaurant, soup and brown bread was always one of the choices on the menu.

I found a recipe for a no knead Irish brown bread on the Good Mood Food Blog that I’m going to give a shot tomorrow on St. Patrick’s Day. I mentioned this blog when I did a post on Irish food blogs. I’ve since added it my RSS feeder because all of the recipes look great and the pictures of the food are the best pictures I’ve seen on any food blog. Donel, the blogger, is a great photographer.

One of the problems with recipes on blogs from other countries can be that they need to be translated a bit. We measure our flour in cups; they weigh their flour in grams. Sometimes the ingredients have different names, too.

I’ve translated this recipe from the Good Mood Food Blog with a little help from gourmetsleuth.com. They have a very handy gram conversion calculator.

Original recipe:

  • 450g of wholemeal flour.
  • 1 teaspoon of salt.
  • 1 7g sachet of dried yeast.
  • 1 teaspoon of treacle.
  • 15 Fl Oz of warm water.
  • A small handful of mixed seeds
Translation:
  • 1.957 cups (just about two cups) of whole wheat flour
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • 1.475 teaspoons of yeast (about 1 ½ teaspoons)
  • 1 teaspoon of treacle (molasses could be used if treacle can’t be found)
  • 15 fl oz of warm water
  • a small handful of mixed seeds
Time Estimates

Prep time: 25 min  

Cook time: 1 hr  

Total time: 1 hr 25 min  

The only other translation we need to know for this recipe is from Celsius to Fahrenheit for the oven. The recipe says to cook at 220°C which is 428°F. That seems a bit high to me, so I looked around at other Irish brown bread recipes and they say to bake at 400°F. That’s what I’ll be going with. For exact directions, click here.

Makes one loaf

This bread would be a great complement to soup, of course, but it would also go very well with your corned beef and cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day.

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