Earlier this month, Subway announced it was removing azodicarbonamide, a chemical that bleaches flour and conditions dough, from its bread products. The chemical isn't used only in food products; it can also be found in yoga mats and rubber soles. It's banned in many other countries because it can cause respiratory problems.

Subway isn’t the only food chain that used the chemical in its bread products. McDonald's, Wendy’s, Arby’s and Starbucks all have some foods that contain it, and it looks like many of those companies are working to eliminate it now.

Today, the Environmental Working Group released a list of nearly 500 products that contain azodicarbonamide. These products don’t come from fast-food chains. They come from the grocery store shelves. 

I won’t post the entire list here. You can head to the EWG site for that. But, it’s a good list to look at and familiarize yourself with if you’re concerned about eliminating azodicarbonamide from your diet. Several brands of hot dogs and hamburger buns come up on the list. Since there are a few signs of spring finally happening and we all think about firing up our grills, which brands contain the chemical might be something you want to know.

Azodicarbonamide "is not known to be toxic to people in the concentration approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration," but workers who are around large volumes of it have "reported respiratory symptoms and skin sensitization." The chemical has not been extensively tested for any harmful health results.

There are big names on the list like Pillsbury, Sara Lee and Wonder, although it’s only a few of their products that contain the chemical. Shoprite, the grocery store that’s closest to me, has it 24 of their products.            

As the EWG says at the bottom of its page, the information in their list reflects the research at the time of publication. Considering the fact that the public is now aware of azodicarbonamide because of the Subway announcement and Jon Stewart highlighting it on “The Daily Show,” I wouldn’t be surprised if many of these food companies started to take the chemical out.

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