All things in moderation. That's what my mom always said, and I think it is sound advice, especially in light of the results of recent survey.

A study published in June in the Journal of Physiology suggests that consuming too many antioxidants, such as the resveratrol found in red wine, may block some of the health benefits of exercise, specifically reduced blood pressure and cholesterol.

This study was performed on men around 65 years old, so it isn't clear whether the results would be similar for women or other age groups. The men weren't drinking wine, but they were taking resveratrol supplements, of 250 milligrams daily.

Let's put this into context. The amount of resveratrol found in one glass of wine can range from 0.2 milligrams to 2.0 mg, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. While 250 mg may seem excessive, it's not uncommon for resveratrol supplements. to include as much as 900 milligrams of resveratrol. [Top 10 Bad Things That Are Good For You]

So what does this tell us? All things in moderation (thanks, mom). In truth, more research must be done to determine whether there could be ill effects from consuming too much of any one antioxidant, but until then, I suggest going the natural route. If you want to get more resveratrol, consume it in your diet. This way, you'll get more than just one isolated nutritional component, and you'll also get fiber that will tell you when it's time to stop eating.

Here are four foods that are good sources of resveratrol:

  • Red Grapes: Grapes don't have to be fermented to contain this antioxidant. It's actually found in the skin of red grapes along with other nutrients, such as minerals manganese and potassium and vitamins K, C and B1.
  • Peanut Butter: Peanut butter is great for dressing up apples and celery, but it also contains some resveratrol (up to .13 mg per cup). Peanut butter is a great source of niacin and manganese.
  • Dark Chocolate: In dark chocolate, resveratrol blends nicely with other antioxidants and also minerals, such as iron, copper and manganese. Who doesn't like chocolate?
  • Blueberries: Blueberries don't have quite as much resveratrol as grapes, but they are also a great source of other antioxidants, dietary fiber, vitamins C and K and manganese.
Healthy Bites appears weekly on LiveScience. Deborah Herlax Enos is a certified nutritionist and a health coach and weight loss expert in the Seattle area with more than 20 years of experience. Read more tips on her blog, Health in a Hurry!

Related on LiveScience and MNN:

This story was originally written for LiveScience and was republished with permission here. Copyright 2013 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company.