Have you seen this video for cooking corn on the cob in a microwave oven? I decided to give it a try because we're eating amazing New Jersey corn several times a week right now. The past couple of days have been in the high 90s here and boiling a large pot of water heats up the kitchen. It seemed like the right time to finally give microwaving a try.

I wanted to find out two things: Did the corn slide out with all the silk gone the way the video shows it does, and does it taste as good as corn boiled in a pot of water? I went to the corner store that has local corn delivered daily and bought two ears that were picked either late yesterday or early this morning. I shucked one ear and boiled it in and water. I used the microwave method on the second ear.

Results from cooking corn on the cob in the microwave

I put the corn in for three minutes like the video suggests. When I took it out, it was steamy. I cut the end off and tried to squeeze the corn out of the end, but it wouldn't budge. I tried everything in the video, but it never slid right out. So I sliced the husk from top to bottom and the corn came out easily with just a little silk on it. It definitely had less silk on it than the piece I shucked, even after being boiled.

Comparison of microwave corn and boiled corn

Both the microwave corn and the boiled corn were thoroughly cooked. The boiled corn, however, was crisper and juicier. The microwave corn was a little chewy. I brought my son into the kitchen and asked him to take a bite of each. He didn't know they were cooked using different methods. He thought the boiled corn had a better texture, too. He said, though, that it wouldn't make a difference to him. He would eat either one. The microwave piece of corn wasn't bad; it just wasn't as firm as the boiled piece.

To me, corn is one of summer's biggest treats. I'll continue to boil mine because I want it to be as fresh as possible. My boys, however, will be happy to know they can now throw a piece in the microwave and have it ready in three minutes.

Have you tried the microwave method with the husk still on? How were your results?

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Robin Shreeves ( @rshreeves ) focuses on food from a family perspective from her home base in New Jersey.