When the clock (tower) struck Oct. 21 in the year 2015, we were not living in the future as shown in the 1989 hit "Back to the Future Part II."

Plenty of the high-tech gizmos shown in the film did come true — from tablet computers to home automation and augmented reality. We even have reproductions of Marty's hover board and a failed internet campaign to produce 15 new feature-length "Jaws" sequels to get the franchise up to the magic 19 shown in the film. Most disappointing of all, however, was that we rang in October 2015 without those awesome self-lacing Nikes:

Yes, you could argue that we got half-way there with the limited-edition Nike Air Mags released back in 2011. Those awesome kicks were perfect in almost every way — from the design to the lights — but lacked the coolest feature of all: self-tying laces at the push of a button.

Thankfully, all we had to be was a little bit more patient to get that last cool feature. Meet Nike's HyperAdapt:

The sneaker sports integrates low tech — fishing line! — and high tech — pressure sensors and LEDs! — to achieve the self-lacing effect (and it is an effect; the laces on the shoe are just for show) The sensors and fishing line system tightens once your foot is in the shoe using "an algorithmic pressure equation" that can be adjusted during the day as needed with some buttons near the tongue.

The LEDs are there to help you know when the shoes are tightening and when you need to charge them. Yes, the shoes have to be charged up to work. It takes around three hours to get the shoes up to a full charge, but that charge will keep the shoes on your feet for up to two weeks.

Start saving your pennies for Nov. 28 when the shoe goes on sale. Nike hasn't announced a price yet, but Wired reports it's going to be pretty steep, and that the shoes will only be available in select Nike stores.

But still — power laces! Now where's my auto-drying jacket?

This story was originally written in February 2014 and has been updated with new information.