Is there a show-off at the gym you’ve been dying to out-rep? Strap on the Titan Arm — a bionic bicep that gives the user the ability to lift 40 more pounds of weight — and curl away.

The new exoskeleton prototype is designed by a group of mechanical engineering students from the University of Pennsylvania and is the winner of the 2013 James Dyson Award. Inspired by the growing number of back disorders in the U.S., the students decided to focus on upper body strength and created the one-arm robotic limb to offer extra body strength for lifting.

Back problems affect more than 600,000 employees each year and are costing the economy an estimated $50 billion annually, according to CNN. The Titan Arm is designed to reduce fatigue and brace the back while sparing the muscles in the elbow. It can be used by anyone who has a job that requires repetitive heavy lifting. Because it straps directly on the arm, it allows the user to lift very heavy objects without the same amount of effort or fatigue.

The Titan Arm design team — which consisted of Elizabeth Beattie, Nicholas McGill, Nick Parrotta and Nikolay Vladimirov— says they were passionate about developing a tool that would allow people to live normally. They talked with patients who were working through disabilities and the therapists who helped them at Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. In the future, they imagine Titan Arm being used in healthcare applications to increase mobility and improve physical therapy.

But the team says there are many other applications to consider. The Titan Arm can be used to help stroke and injury victims rebuild muscle and relearn fine motor control. The makers envision doctors monitoring patients remotely through sensors on the exoskeleton.

The Titan Arm is lightweight and is made of mostly aluminum, which cuts the total weight to 20 pounds, including the battery and cable system. The makers say current exoskeletons can cost more than $100,000, but their product was created for less than $2,000.

“Right now we are also looking at patents," McGill told the Daily Pennsylvanian. "Going forward, it’s always good to have a patent at your back,” he added. “Commercialization is an avenue that’s tough to go down — it involves humans, which means a lot of testing and regulations … we are not certain at this point.”

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