Think you have a short attention span?  

Wait, are you still reading?

If so, you are in better shape than the average American, whose attention span has plummeted from 12 seconds in 2000 to 8 seconds in 2013. Still, the vast majority of us could probably use some help when it comes to strengthening our concentration muscles.  

A new app, called Focus@will, is out to help us all do just that. The neuroscience-based app uses music to boost attention span, and it claims to be able to increase concentration by a whopping 400 percent.  

Focus@will uses music to "engage with the brain's limbic system,” according to the website. This is important because most of the music you probably listen to throughout the day is designed to engage your attention. This actually makes it difficult to listen to music while you work or study, but by selecting music that lacks vocals, saxophones, or other tunes that might be distracting, the app claims to be able to increase a listener's ability to “get into the concentration flow."  

Focus@will was developed in partnership with two neuroscientists. The company claims use of the app typically results in a 12 to 15 percent positive increase in "focus biomarker" and up to 400 percent extended concentration.

To tune in to this app, users must subscribe, but once they do, they get unlimited access to this attention-span boosting music for $3.99 per month.

Skeptics claim that the idea for Focus@will is too "one-size-fits-all" to work for everyone. Some people can concentrate while listening to certain types of music while others cannot. There also isn't any real science backing up the claims that Focus@will works like it says it does, but if you like to listen to music while you work, it might be worth giving Focus@will a try.  

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