I knew Dubai (and Abu Dhabi and Kuwait) were over the top, but a $1 million Bugatti Veyron police car? Not even hedge fund haven Greenwich, Connecticut, (which pays cops in white gloves to direct traffic at intersections) would have dreamed that large:

Evildoers should know that Dubai’s force has a vehicle capable of 253 mph and zero to 60 in 2.5 seconds. And if that one’s busy, it’s got supercar stablemates like a $1-million-plus Aston Martin One-77, a Lamborghini Aventador, a McLaren, an Aston Martin and even a Mercedes G63 AMG with Brabus tuning — and more than 700 horsepower.

McLaren police car in Dubai

Dubai's force boasts this ultra-powerful McLaren, too. (Photo: Vocativ)

I’d love to hear tales of crooks run to the ground with these things.

It’s somewhat ironic that these desert paradises conspicuously display their gas guzzlers, because their entire wealth is based on oil and more oil. A Tesla Model S was recently spotted on the streets of Dubai, and the company doesn’t even sell them there:

There is a “Ferrari World” in Abu Dhabi, and the company has experienced sharp sales growth there, along with strong sales for Lamborghini, Aston and Porsche. Kuwait is the biggest market for both Aston Martin and high-end Porsche builder Ruf. "The Wheeler Dealers" report that in Dubai, many seemingly abandoned supercars bake under the desert sun:

Supercar companies would go out of business without Middle Eastern clients, and many models are aimed directly at that clientele. The first three Soleil Anadis, a $300,000 customized Corvette, all went to the region.

I saw a German Porsche 911 police car at the Greenwich Concours, and those old Police Interceptor Fords were plenty fast, but really, a Bugatti Veyron?

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