In a new interview with Entertainment Weekly, Angelina Jolie has revealed that she likely has one more surgery in her preemptive fight against cancer

"There's still another surgery to have, which I haven't yet," the 38-year-old 'Maleficent' actress said. "I'll get advice from all these wonderful people who I've been talking to, to get through that next stage."

After publicly revealing in a NY Time op-ed piece last year that she had elected to undergo a double-mastectomy, People Magazine reported that Jolie would next pursue the removal of her ovaries via a procedure called an oophorectomy. The actress wrote that she turned to surgery after tests revealed she had an "87 percent risk of breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of ovarian cancer" due to an inherited (and notorious) gene mutation known as BRCA1.

"I feel very, very close — much closer — to other women, and women who are going through the same thing," she told EW. "Wherever I go, usually I run into women and we talk about health issues, women’s issues, breast cancer, ovarian cancer. I’ve talked to men about their daughters’ and wives’ health. It makes me feel closer to other people who deal with the same things and have either lost their parents or are considering surgeries or wondering about their children. … The reason that I wrote it was to try to communicate and help and connect with other women and other families going through the same thing. And … I was very, very moved by all the support and kindness from so many people."

Only weeks after going public with her decision, Jolie's Aunt, Debbie Martin, passed away from breast cancer at 61. Her mother, Marcheline Bertrand, passed away from ovarian cancer at age 56 in 2007. "There is no longevity on my mother's side of the family," Jolie said in an earlier interview. "My grandmother also died young (age 45), so my mother always thought it could happen to her."

According to the Mayo Clinic, an oophorectomy reduces the risk of ovarian cancer (especially for those women with either the BRCA1 or BRCA2) gene by 80-90 percent. The procedure, while less invasive than a mastectomy, does result in immediate menopause, as well as the inability to conceive.

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