At every Olympic competition, history is made as athletes come together from around the world to compete in the stadiums, fields, arenas, courts and pools of the host country. But this year, the 2016 Summer Olympic Games will make history even before a single athlete gets into a starting position. That is because this year, for the first time ever, a team of refugee athletes will compete at the games under the Olympic flag.

"These refugees have no home, no team, no flag, no national anthem," Thomas Bach, president of the International Olympic Committee, said in a statement announcing the members of the team. "We will offer them a home in the Olympic Village together with all the athletes of the world. The Olympic anthem will be played in their honor and the Olympic flag will lead them into the stadium."

The six men and four women who make up the Refugee Olympic Team will walk into the opening ceremony in Rio's Maracana Stadium ahead of host country Brazil. The funding provided by the Olympic committee will help offset the cost of the athletes' training, equipment and travel to the Olympic Games.

Want to meet the team? Here they are:

1. Rami Anis

Syrian refugee Rami Anis fled to Turkey in 2011 when the war in his home country began. From there, he rode an inflatable raft to Greece and made his way to Belgium, where he now lives and trains. Anis will swim the men's 100-meter butterfly.

2. Yonas Kinde


Thirty-six-year-old Yonas Kinde fled his home country of Ethiopia to Luxemburg in 2013, citing conditions that put his life in danger. Watch for Kinde as he competes in the men's marathon.

3. Yiech Pur Biel


South Sudanese athlete Yiech Pur Biel fled his home country of South Sudan at the age of 10. The young athlete played lots of sports during his stay in the refugee camps of Kenya as a way to connect with others; it wasn't until last year, at the age of 20, that he began running competitively. Biel will compete in the men's 800-meter.

4. James Nyang Chiengjiek


Like Biel, Chiengjiek also began his running career in the refugee camps of Kenya. His father, a soldier, was killed in Sudan in 1999 during the war. When war broke out again in 2011, Chiengjiek fled the country to escape the same fate. He will run the men's 400-meter.

5. Anjelina Nadai Lohalith


Now 21, Anjelina Nadai Lohalith has not seen her parents since she was 6 years old, when she was taken by one of her aunts to live in a refugee camp in Kenya. Lohalith, originally from South Sudan, will run the women's 1500-meter.

6. Rose Nathike Lokonyen


Rose Nathike Lokonyen is yet another South Sudanese athlete who fled her home country as a child to live in the refugee camps of Kenya. She left her country at the age of 9 with her family. But when her parents returned to South Sudan in 2008, Lokonyen stayed behind with her siblings in the camp. The 23-year-old runner will compete in the women's 800-meter.

7. Paulo Amotun Lokoro


Paulo Amotun Lokoro fled South Sudan for Kenya in 2006 at the age of 14 to live in the refugee camp with his mother, who had been in the camp since 2002. Watch for 24-year-old Lokoro during the men's 1500-meter.

8. Yolande Bukasa Mabika

Yolande Bukasa Mabika was orphaned by the war in her home country, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC.) She was raised in the capital city of Kinshasa in a home for displaced children. In 2013, Mabika fled to Brazil and sought asylum during the World Judo Championships, and she has lived there ever since. She hopes to earn a medal in women's half-heavyweight judo.

9. Popole Misenga


Popole Misenga was 9 years old when the war in the DRC broke out, separating him from his family. He spent eight days wandering the forest alone before he was brought to Kinshasa. Like his teammate Mabika, Misenga sought asylum in Brazil during the 2013 World Judo Championships, and he will compete in men's middleweight judo.

10. Yusra Mardini


Yusra Mardini rode on an inflatable raft to flee her home country of Syria in 2015. At one point, when the raft was taking on too much water and was in danger of sinking, Mardini jumped overboard to lighten the load and helped to push the raft. She swam this way for more than three hours until the boat reached shore. In Rio, 17-year-old Mardini will compete in the women's 200-meter freestyle.