At 117, Jamaica's Violet Mosses Brown is often asked the secret to living a long, healthy life. Brown is now the oldest person in the world after the death of Emma Morano of Italy on April 16.

"Really and truly, when people ask what me eat and drink to live so long [sic], I say to them that I eat everything, except pork and chicken, and I don't drink rum and dem tings," Brown once told her local paper, the Jamaica Gleaner.

Born March 4, 1900, Brown said she was baptized at 13 and she loves the church. She has a plaque she received from the Trelawny Baptist Association when she was 107 years old.

Affectionately called "Aunt V," Brown and her husband worked as cane farmers, according to the Jamaica Observer. When her husband later became a caretaker for a nearby cemetery, Brown took care of the record keeping. She has also worked as a dressmaker and domestic helper.

A tough childhood

"I tell you, these young people these days have it easy — piped water, taxis and buses to bring them where they want to go, everything to their convenience," she told the Gleaner. "When I was younger, and even as an adult, I had to work so hard that sometimes when I look back, I cry at how hard I had to work to make a living for my family."

Brown had to walk three miles barefoot to get water for her family and return home in time to go to school by 9 a.m.

Her hobbies include reading, listening to music and reciting poetry. And, as mentioned, she likes to eat.

One of her caretakers told the Jamaica Observer in 2016 that she "likes fish and mutton and sometimes she will have cow foot.” She also likes sweet potatoes, Irish potatoes, breadfruit and fruit, such as oranges and mangoes.

Passing the torch

Morano, who passed away at 117, was the last supercentenarian known to have been born in the 1800s. A supercentenarian is someone who has lived to or passed their 110th birthday. Born on Nov. 29, 1899, Morano's life spanned three centuries.

Morano credited her longevity to her diet. For about 90 years, she ate three eggs (two raw, one cooked), fresh pasta and raw meat. Morano's daily diet changed only in the final years of her life.

Mary Jo DiLonardo writes about everything from health to parenting — and anything that helps explain why her dog does what he does.