On May 8, famed naturalist and broadcaster Sir David Attenborough will turn 91, an age he fully admits is not without its drawbacks.

In an interview with the Telegraph, Attenborough admitted that he's been struggling of late to recall the "proper names" of things, a handicap that has impeded the amount of time it takes him to write narration scripts.

"There were these searing yellow fields and I can’t think of the damn name," he said of a recent trip to the Jura Mountains in Switzerland. "I wanted to say something about it but I couldn’t and it wasn’t until we got quite close to Geneva that I thought, of course, oil seed rape."

Sir David Attenborough, seen here in 1965, tells the UK Telegraph that he's 'come to terms' with his memory loss, but has no plans to slow down anytime soon. Sir David Attenborough, seen here in 1965, tells the UK Telegraph that he's 'come to terms' with his memory loss, but has no plans to slow down anytime soon. (Photo: David Cairns/Getty Images)

Despite, as he says it, "running into problems" due to memory loss, Attenborough has no plans of winding down his career of more than 60 years.

“I’m fantastically lucky. I think, ‘Oh, I’ll go to the Amazon next year – why not?’ I’m more grateful than I can say that people still want me to do things," he told the Independent last year.

“You never tire of the natural world," he added. "Putting your feet up is all very well, but it’s very boring, isn’t it?”

What's next for the voice of nature?

Despite professing a lack of interest in both email and the Internet, Attenborough has openly embraced the world of virtual reality. Despite professing a lack of interest in both email and the Internet, Attenborough has openly embraced the world of virtual reality. (Photo: Sky)

After yet another jaw-dropping hit with the groundbreaking nature series "Planet Earth II," Attenborough is turning his attention to filming a follow-up to the BBC ocean series "Blue Planet." In partnership with the Natural History Museum in London and Sky TV, he will also be turned into a hologram for a new virtual reality exhibit. Called "Hold the World," the interactive experience will allow viewers with VR gear to examine fossils, bones, skulls and other items with narration by Attenborough.

“'Hold the World' offers people a unique opportunity: to examine rare objects, some millions of years old,” he said. “It represents an extraordinary new step in how people can explore and experience nature, all from the comfort of their own homes.”

However he reaches our eyes and ears, Attenborough's goal in the time he has left remains as it ever was, to inspire people to care for the world and the species around them.

"I'm optimistic because of children," he said at the Earth Optimism Summit in Cambridge last week. "I see a lot of children, children write to me, and it is my impression that over the last 60 years, they have become aware, and it is their belief that the natural world is their inheritance."

Michael d'Estries ( @michaeldestries ) covers science, technology, art, and the beautiful, unusual corners of our incredible world.