With "Jurassic World" taking a record-breaking bite out of the film industry, scripts involving giant prehistoric predators that have languished in obscurity are suddenly very attractive properties. 

One such example is  "MEG," a modern-day thriller that focuses on megalodon, a massive prehistoric shark that went extinct some 1.6 million years ago. Once the ocean's most feared predators, megalodon could reach lengths of 55 feet long and weigh nearly 100 tons. Inside its giant, powerful jaws were also rows of teeth that ranged from 6-7 inches long. Despite numerous attempts to make us all believe megalodon is still swimming around out there (the most famous of which was a widely panned 2013 Discovery Channel mockumentary called "Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives"), science is 100% sure the once mighty shark is no longer a threat. 

Enter "MEG," which despite the extinction tag, aims to elevate megalodon into the kind of villain even "Jaws" would swim far away from. Based on the 1997 New York Times bestseller of the same name, the film revolves around two men attempting to track and destroy a megalodon terrorizing the coast along China. In what's a positive sign for the film's development, famed horror director Eli Roth ("The Green Inferno", "Hostel") is reportedly in talks to direct

Roth is not only a perfect fit for his horror credentials but also because he's a guy with genuine interest in the sea. Besides nearly perishing himself from a variety of bizarre ocean mishaps, Roth will also play host this summer for the Discovery Channel's "Shark After Dark" late night talk show during its annual "Shark Week."

"Being part of this is a dream come true for me as I’ve been a Shark Week fan for 20 years – it’s my favorite television week of the year,” said Roth in a statement. “I am completely shark obsessed and cannot wait to dive in and help create the most exciting Shark Week in years."

"MEG" was previously in development nearly 20 years ago with Disney, but was scrapped after another giant shark film, "Deep Blue Sea," tanked at the box office. Now, with "Jurrasic World's" star ocean predator as popular as the T-Rex and videos of massive great white sharks going viral, it appears that audiences are once again interested in dipping their toes into dangerous waters. 

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