Following comments she made to Harper's Bazaar, suggesting that breastfeeding become a mandatory, "worldwide law," Gisele Bundchen finds herself on the defensive.

After a tsunami of negative feedback flooded the Web, the supermodel — who recently had her first child with NFL star Tom Brady — took to her blog to clarify her position.

"My intention in making a comment about the importance of breastfeeding has nothing to do with the law," Bundchen writes. "It comes from my passion and beliefs about children. Becoming a new mom has brought a lot of questions, I feel like I am in a constant search for answers on what might be the best for my child."

She adds: "It's unfortunate that in an interview sometimes things can seem so black and white. I am sure if I would just be sitting talking about my experiences with other mothers, we would just be sharing opinions."

In the Harper's Bazaar interview, Bundchen said, "Some people here (in the U.S.) think they don't have to breastfeed, and I think 'Are you going to give chemical food to your child when they are so little?' I think there should be a worldwide law, in my opinion, that mothers should breastfeed their babies for six months."

In response, the Web filled with comments slamming Bundchen on the suggestion. "Not every woman can breastfeed," wrote one. "While it may be great, there are some who don't produce milk. I was not one of them. Without formula my baby would've died of starvation."

Bundchen explained further on her site writing, "I understand that everyone has their own experience and opinions and I am not here to judge. I believe that bringing a life into this world is the single most important thing a person can undertake, and it can also be the most challenging. I think as mothers we are all just trying our best."

I think it was a wise move for Bundchen to explain herself a bit better — and she's right that interviews don't allow much room for exposition. However, comments about parenting — especially by celebrities — are almost always incendiary, especially when it comes to overarching suggestions like this one. It's one of the more sensitive topics in society and best left alone when sitting in the interview chair ... no matter how harmless the opinion might appear.

But hey — maybe I'm wrong here. Let me know down below what you think about her comments in both Harper's Bazaar and on her blog! 

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