Leonardo DiCaprio may be well-known for his acting and environmental pursuits, but the 40-year-old is also a rising force in the art world. The past few years in particular have seen the star raise millions for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), as well as millions more through the sale of prestigious works to benefit conservation projects

His latest generous gift of philanthropy comes with a donation to LACMA of an art installation called "Solar Reserve" by artist John Gerrard. The massive piece, containing a 28 × 24 foot frameless LED wall, presents a digital simulation of a Nevada solar thermal plant and its surrounding landscape. 

"At the center of this dazzling virtual world is a tower surrounded by 10,000 mirrors that adjust their positions in real time according to the location of the sun and reflect light upon the tower to generate electricity," Gerrard writes. "This hyper-realistic simulation is created with a team of programmers using a sophisticated video game engine that situates the sun, moon, and stars as they would appear at the actual Nevada site over the course of a year."

"Solar Reserve," which ran for two months last year at Lincoln Center in New York to much acclaim, will be purchased by DiCaprio through a gallery. According to the Los Angeles Times, he will then donate it to LACMA. 

"He saw the work and thought it was fantastic and then thought of us," Michael Govan, the director of LACMA, told the Times. "He has been an incredible friend to the museum. ... He's growing into a force in terms of thinking about culture in the broad sense."

In a statement, DiCaprio said he was honored to help bring the exhibit to Los Angeles, adding that such art helps to raise further awareness on our planet's future. 

"Whether it is through art or other venues, we must work to promote a healthy and sustainable future for our planet and I hope to continue to bring additional exhibits to Los Angeles and beyond that promote this message," he said.

Gerrard has made five editions of "Solar Reserve," with current viewings available at Art Basel in Switzerland, the Borusan Museum in Istanbul and the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. 

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