Discovery Communications has always been creepy fast when it comes to pouncing on documentaries about recent natural disasters, so perhaps it's no surprise that they've decided to throw their hat in with a documentary on the late Steve Jobs. 


The Apple founder, who passed away last week from pancreatic cancer at the age of 56, will be the focus of "iGenius: How Steve Jobs Changed the World" (Oct. 16, 8 p.m. EST). Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, from the hit Discovery series "Mythbusters" will host the one hour special. 


"Someone once said that to follow the path that others have laid before you is a very reasonable course of action, therefore all progress is made by unreasonable men," Savage said. "Steve Jobs was an unreasonable man. He didn't simply give the public what they wanted, he defined entirely new ways of thinking about our lives in the digital space: productivity, creativity, music, communication, media and art. He has touched, directly and indirectly, all of our lives."


To complement the look at Steve's life, Discovery has secured interviews with key figures from his past; which once again makes me think this whole thing was prepared way in advance of the Apple CEO's passing. Creepy. From Entertainment Weekly:


"Lee Felsenstein, founding member of the Homebrew Computer Club, Daniel Kottke, who traveled to India with Jobs and who later become an early Apple employee, and John Draper, an engineer who gave Jobs his start. Musicians Stevie Wonder and Pete Wentz will talk about how Jobs’ innovations impacted their careers."


Of course, Discovery isn't the only media entity interested in Jobs — Sony is paying $1 million for the film rights to Walter Isaacson's authorized biography, "Steve Jobs." The 656-page book is in pre-order, but is already No. 1 on Amazon and iTunes. It features more than 40 interviews with Jobs conducted over two years — as well as "interviews with more than a hundred family members, friends, adversaries, competitors and colleagues."


Expect Sony to fast-track the film for release within the next two years.