In 2007, the BBC premiered "Planet Earth," the most expensive nature documentary ever commissioned and the first to be shot entirely in high definition. The 11-episode series not only went on to win everything from an Emmy to a Peabody Award, but it also became the most-watched cable television event in American history, reaching more than 100 million viewers in total. As you may have experienced yourself, the documentary also was widely credited with convincing people to make the switch to HDTV.

Nearly 10 years later, the BBC is back with an official sequel titled "Planet Earth II." Narrated once more by the iconic voice of Sir David Attenborough, this six-part series promises to yet again pull back the curtain on the animal kingdom in unprecedented detail.

"Ten years after 'Planet Earth' first brought the wonders of the natural world to viewers in HD, 'Planet Earth II' is another game-changer," executive producer Mike Gunton said at a launch event. "Shot in UHD, the epic scale and ambition of this series is second to none. It will be a truly immersive experience, providing audiences with a unique perspective on the most extraordinary places and animals on our planet."

Planet Earth II Shot in stunning 4K, 'Planet Earth II' promises to show us an up-close and exquisitely detailed look at our natural world. (Photo: BBC)

In addition to being shot in 4K high definition, a visual upgrade that might once again convince people to update their televisions, the new series also will feature an original soundtrack produced Hollywood great Hans Zimmer and composed by Jacob Shea and Jasha Klebe.

"Projects such as 'Planet Earth II' come along once in a lifetime," Zimmer said in a release. "It is the gold standard of wildlife documentaries and with it comes an enormous creative responsibility. It has been a joy and a privilege to be involved in such a globally important project.”

You can check out a preview of the soul-stirring acoustics Zimmer has in store for viewers below.

"Planet Earth II" will debut on the BBC later this year.