Never one to see the future with rose-colored glasses, Stephen Hawking is once again urging humanity to take a long, hard look in the mirror and recognize the major shortcomings that may one day doom us. 

The 73-year-old famed theoretical physicist, the subject of the Oscar-winning film "The Theory of Everything,"  was recently asked what fault in humans he could minimize if possible. 

"The human failing I would most like to correct is aggression," he said. "It may have had survival advantage in caveman days, to get more food, territory or partner with whom to reproduce, but now it threatens to destroy us all. A major nuclear war would be the end of civilization, and maybe the end of the human race."

Hawking's most-recent doom and gloom doubles-down on comments he made in 2013 in which he blamed our genetic code for enabling our "selfish and aggressive instincts." 

"It will be difficult enough to avoid disaster in the next hundred years, let alone the next thousand or million,” he told The Canadian Press. 

Hawking also believes that if our own natural instincts don't kill us, artificial intelligence may get the job done instead. "Humans, who are limited by slow biological evolution, couldn't compete and would be superseded," he said. 

In what's something of a ray of hope, Hawking does believe that humanity can provide something of a lifeboat for the species by continuing to explore space.

"I believe that the long term future of the human race must be space and that it represents an important life insurance for our future survival, as it could prevent the disappearance of humanity by colonizing other planets." 

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