A little over a year since his passing from complications related to pancreatic cancer, the personal yacht that Steve Jobs spent years designing has finally been christened. 

 

Estimated at between 230ft to 260ft long, the ship, much like Apple's high-tech products, is made out of aluminum. This not only allows for a faster vessel, but also a lighter one. There's also a massive sundeck with a built-in jucuzzi, a gorgeous glass cabin, and seven 27-inch iMacs that handle the ship's navigation and controls.

 

"When you take a step back, squint a little and turn your head to the left, it sort of looks like an iPhone 4 with the strip of windows around the middle and the clean lines," writes Adam Clark Estes of The Atlantic Wire. 

 

Jobs first revealed his yacht plans during interviews with biographer Walter Isaacson; saying that he had been working with ship designer Phillipe Stack on the project for six years. 

 

 

"After our omelets at the café, we went back to his house and he showed me all of the models and architectural drawings," writes Isaacson in his best-selling book "Steve Jobs". "As expected, the planned yacht was sleek and minimalist. The teak decks were perfectly flat and unblemished by any accoutrements. As at an Apple store, the cabin windows were large panes, almost floor to ceiling, and the main living area was designed to have walls of glass that were forty feet long and ten feet high. He had gotten the chief engineer of the Apple stores to design a special glass that was able to provide structural support. By then the boat was under construction by the Dutch custom yacht builders Feadship, but Jobs was still fiddling with the design. "I know that it’s possible I will die and leave Laurene with a half-built boat," he said. "But I have to keep going on it. If I don’t, it’s an admission that I’m about to die."

 

This ship, officially named "Venus", was recently christened by the Jobs family; who also provided everyone who worked on the vessel with iPod Shuffles thanking them for “hard work and craftsmanship.”

 

Check out video of the yacht courtesy of Dutch blog One More Thing below.

 

The opinions expressed by MNN Bloggers and those providing comments are theirs alone, and do not reflect the opinions of MNN.com. While we have reviewed their content to make sure it complies with our Terms and Conditions, MNN is not responsible for the accuracy of any of their information.