U2 is taking advantage of one of the biggest events of the year to give fans a new song and help raise money for charity in the process. 

The Irish rockers will premiere their new single "Invisible" during a commercial for Bank of America on Super Bowl Sunday. Immediately following, the song will be available for free via iTunes for 24 hours. During that time, Bank of America will donate $1 for every download (up to $2M) to The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. But the giving doesn't stop there. In fact, BankofA has committed a total of $10M - a generous gesture that resulted in some huge matching donations from other orgs. 

"Bank of America coming on as a (RED) partner to help the Global Fund's efforts to eliminate AIDS is great news," said Bono in a statement. "It's the kind of game-changing influence that will not just deliver millions of dollars but raise consciousness and keep public pressure on putting an end to this devastating pandemic which has already taken the lives of 35 million people. And just in...the bank's commitment of $10 million has resulted in the Gates Foundation, SAP and Africa's Motsepe Family matching for a total of $22 million. Incredible."

According to Billboard, Bono's (RED) charity has raised some $240M for the Global Fund since its founding in 2006. This latest donation from BankofA will push it over the quarter-billion mark - an amazing milestone. 

"As an American company, but also a global one, Bank of America looks for opportunities to solve important issues that matter, link opens in a new window, to all of us — here at home and around the world. And so we will continue to prioritize ways to contribute at home, while also finding places and moments where we can have an impact globally," the company writes on the campaign site

"This is one of those moments. A moment where together we have the collective ability to make a difference in the critical global AIDS fight."

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