"We all recycle on the set, and at home my wife's really into everything green. We compost, we're big recyclers. We had a garden for a while and had watermelons and corn. She's an artist and her art has a lot to do with nature," says Jake M. Johnson, who plays Nick on the Fox sitcom "New Girl."

 

Johnson scored this season with the sitcom, his first series. "There's a sweetness to the show and in real life we have that same feeling. We all genuinely like each other. The 'E! True Hollywood Story' on this would be very uninteresting. There's no scandal."

 

Like Nick, Johnson, a Chicago native, lived with roommates at a point where he was floundering in his life. "I relate to where Nick is at. What I like about him is he's a guy that has all the potential in the world but just hasn't gotten there. I like playing characters that have fallen slightly off the tracks."

 

Recently seen as the principal in "21 Jump Street," which reteamed him with his "Get Him to the Greek" co-star Jonah Hill, Johnson has a role opposite Aubrey Plaza and Mark Duplass in the dark comedy "Safety Not Guaranteed," which premiered at Sundance, and will be released June 8. He plays a cool, confident, fast-talking guy who works at a magazine when he first appears, "and then things kind of crumble down for him."

 

The season finale of "New Girl," involving a trip to the desert and one of the roommates' decision to move out, airs May 8.

 

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"I am insane about recycling, I try to cut down on as much waste as possible," says Andy Cohen, Bravo's Executive Vice President of Development and Talent who hosts its Sunday-Thursday night talk show "Watch What Happens Live."

 

"I love putting people in situations that you wouldn't expect to see them in," says Cohen, whose guests this week include "The Avengers'" Hulk and anti-fracking crusader Mark Ruffalo (May 3), "Suburgatory" star Jeremy Sisto (May 6) and celeb chef Cat Cora (May 8). "I love seeing weird combinations of people. You don't know what they're going to be like and what is going to happen."

 

Cohen has been obsessed with celebrities since he was a kid, so being able to work on both sides of the TV camera has been a dream come true, and "an incredible gift," one that he's written about in a memoir entitled "Most Talkative: Stories From the Front Lines of Pop Culture," which follows his journey from interviewing Susan Lucci for his college newspaper to dishing with — and wrangling — the volatile Real Housewives. It's also available as an audiobook, narrated by Andy himself. Both are in stores May 8.

 

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Tune in: The average American male is alive for about 900 months, five of which he'll spend on telephone hold, 198 watching TV and just two having sex. Premiering May 8, History Channel's "United Stats of America" crunches more notable numbers in a new series hosted by identical twin standup comics Randy and Jason Sklar.

 

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