Water is a favorite photography subject, but it's not only rushing waterfalls, crashing waves and peacefully flowing rivers that draw us in.

Zooming in — way in — on tiny droplets of water opens up a whole new world as the camera captures the light and color reflected and refracted by water. Even tiny images within the drops themselves can become the centerpiece of a photograph. The following photos are examples of the beauty dew drops add to the world.

Water makes simple things look intricate. Water makes simple things look intricate. (Photo: alexsvirid/Shutterstock)

Tip: You don't have to wait for a damp morning to capture dew drop photos. Use a water bottle and mist the flowers, grasses or other objects that you want to photograph with water droplets. You can then also control just how many droplets are featured in your photo.

Capture images within images using water drops. Capture images within images using water drops. (Photo: surut/Shutterstock)

Tip: To capture dew drops that refract objects, photographers make use of a technique called focus stacking. This means taking several photographs with a slightly different point of focus and then stacking them in post-processing. Here is a tutorial on how to capture images like the one above.

The spines of a desert-dwelling cactus are decorated with droplets. The spines of a desert-dwelling cactus are decorated with droplets. (Photo: Chayasit Fangem/Shutterstock)

Tip: Use a background that helps set off your water droplets. A solid color, or a blurred background that isn't too complicated, will help your water droplets stand out and keep viewers' attention on the detail within the drops themselves, rather than on what else is going on in the image.

The needles of a blue spruce are spruced up with drops of dew. The needles of a blue spruce are spruced up with drops of dew. (Photo: Studio 37/Shutterstock)

Tip: Think about capturing patterns, designs and textures with your dew drop photos. Droplets on the end of each spruce needle create a fan-like design of little jewels. Selective focus with a shallow depth of field keeps the focus on just a few of the needles and simplifies the photo, while still hinting at the texture from the needles in the background.

drops add color and interest to a dry leaf. Water drops add color and interest to a dry leaf. (Photo: pizla09/Shutterstock)

Tip: You can magnify the texture of the surface of an object with water droplets, such as with the leaf above. Get creative with how you can use dew drops to amplify the intricate details of an object.

This spider web is bejeweled with dew. This spider web is bejeweled with dew. (Photo: Pitiya Phinjongsakundit/Shutterstock)

Tip: To get water droplets that are larger, add a little glycerine to your water bottle. The nontoxic substance helps water particles bind together, so instead of just mist, you'll be able to get some larger water drops of the size that allow you to photograph refracted images and other creative compositions.

A colorful background is doubled when water is added to the scene. A colorful background is doubled when water is added to the scene. (Photo: sss615/Shutterstock)

Tip: A good macro lens and extension tubes are the best way to capture dew drop photos, but don't let a lack of equipment stop you from trying. You can also use a zoom lens. Get your subject close to your lens and zoom all the way in to blur your background. Experiment with creative ideas while you save up for gear specific to macro photography.

Water drops not only add interest to the subject, but can also create beautiful bokeh in the background. Water drops not only add interest to the subject, but can also create beautiful bokeh in the background. (Photo: siriwat wongchana/Shutterstock)

Tip: Always use a tripod when photographing water droplets to ensure you have a nice, sharp image. Camera shake, combined with any breeze or vibration causing the water to tremble, will result in a fuzzy photo. So minimize shake where you can by putting your camera on a tripod. Your photos will be that much more sharp, and that much more amazing.

A little water goes a long way in making a creative photograph. A little water goes a long way in making a creative photograph. (Photo: Kuttelvaserova Stuchelova/Shutterstock)

Jaymi Heimbuch ( @jaymiheimbuch ) focuses on wildlife conservation and animal news from her home base in San Francisco.