As far as the environment goes, there may be hope for the Osbourne clan after all. Ms. Kelly Osbourne famously said “screw the environment” earlier this year, and her dad Ozzy Osbourne may have spent his wilder days not being kind to animals (biting heads off birds and snorting lines of ants, to be precise), not to mention Jack Osbourne’s slip that his entire family doesn’t recycle, at Live Earth no less. But Ozzy has turned over a new green leaf with his latest album containing the protest song “God Bless the Almighty Dollar,” and recent evidence suggests that the young slimmed-down Jack, in spite of his claim, “recycling has no benefit,” may be paving a new, more respectable path for the family.

Not only did he just announce that he’ll never bed another famous broad because they’re all sick (word has it he got very natural with a certain nouveau-greenie whose last name is the same as a certain hotel chain, and word now also has it that Jack is mad at mum Sharon Osbourne for blabbing about this gossip) but now he’s also just denounced that other green blondie, Madonna. Jack told ZOO magazine, "She goes on about saving the planet but she owns stock in companies that pollute the environment. It's bollocks." He was referring to a story by (guess who?) Fox News that puts that number of ill-invested dollars at 2.7 mill. On the one hand, not very globally cool, Madge. But on the other, it’s more of the usual conservative bashing of celebs who are trying to use their considerable leverage for a greater good.

What gives the son of The Prince of Darkness the right to say anything on the matter? For one, he recently hosted the BBC program Saving Planet Earth. In an episode that debuted last month, he went to Namibia to report on the overpopulation of elephants competing with humans for food and water. While there, and despite the havoc they wreak on the land and property of the locals, Jack became a fan. "Like in a zoo, they seem tame. You want to run and give them a big hug." Is it weird that I feel the same way about Jack’s doddering, rocking dad?

This article originally appeared in Plenty in August 2007.

Copyright Environ Press 2007