Canadiana Village main street, Montreal, Canada The main street of Canadiana Village, a 19th century tourist site outside Montreal. (Photo: Canadiana Village)

Located on 138 acres in beautiful Rawdon, Quebec, just north of Montreal sits the rustic 19th-century community of Canadiana Village. Like something straight out of "Little House on the Prairie," the town features a jail, taxidermy, windmill, bank, and dozens of other homes and buildings. There's only one catch: no one lives here –– and only one home is modern enough to move into.

As it turns out, Canadiana Village is a tourist village, serving as both a unique time capsule of 19th century western living and a gigantic set for film and television productions. Since 1986, it has served as the backdrop for more than 110 film productions ranging from "Barnum" starring Burt Lancaster to the Bob Dylan biographical drama "I'm Not There."

An aerial view of part of the village of Canadiana. The total site covers more than 65 acres. An aerial view of part of the village of Canadiana. The total site covers more than 65 acres. (Photo: Canadiana Village)

Currently for sale for $2.8 million, the 37-acre village began as a passion project back in 1946. The late Earle and Nora Moore, keen to preserve 19th century buildings slated for demolition, began privately purchasing and relocating structures from all over the country to Canadiana. They then meticulously furnished them with matching antiques –– from pharmacy bottles and measuring scales to crude dental collections.

Some of the preserved historic buildings include a settler's cabin from 1815, a blacksmith shop from 1842, and even a 1835 log schoolhouse featuring desks with century-old initials from students past. You'll also appreciate the Covered Edward Bridge from 1888 that was re-erected in 1972 over Canadiana's small river. A portion of the structures, built specifically for film shoots, are nothing more than hollow facades.

Many of the structures in Canadiana village are authentic 19th-century buildings that were saved from demolition and relocated to the site. Many of the structures in Canadiana Village are authentic 19th-century buildings that were saved from demolition and relocated to the site. (Photo: Canadiana Village)

From 1970 until just before the turn of the century, Canadiana Village was open to the public, with guides in period costume offering skills demonstrations on everything from spinning and dyeing wool to churning milk and making ice cream. As estimated 30,000 people visited the site annually until its closure in 1996.

"You can buy it, but live in it? You'd have to build homes on it that are livable because these ones are really used for decor," Sotheby's real estate agent Mary-Catherine Kaija told CBC News. "There's only one livable home."

The one thing in Canadiana that needs absolutely no upgrades is the scenery. According to the listing, the 138-acre site features panoramic mountain views and an untouched beautiful forest, valley, stream, and lake.

You can check out a photo gallery of the various on-site structures and natural features of Canadiana below. To examine the listing in more detail, jump here.

Michael d'Estries ( @michaeldestries ) covers science, technology, art, and the beautiful, unusual corners of our incredible world.