Apparently, sleeping in a trash bag is so last summer. And by last summer I mean 2013.

The summer of 2014's hottest music festival must-have was the compost pile-ready tent. Well, the hottest must-have at one musical festival in The Netherlands.

The creation of Alaska-born, Delft-based designer Devin Malone, the biodegradable One Nights Tent  billed as "The World's First Recyclable Tent" — made its grand (pilot) debut at last month's A Campingflight to Lowlands Paradise (aka: Lowlands) festival outside of Amsterdam following a prototype test run at a "beach party in Valencia, Spain."

Made from a waterproof, bio-based material and sporting a compact footprint that’s still spacious enough to fit two knackered festivalgoers either overnight or for a quick afternoon siesta/snuggle, the double-walled One Nights Tent (say it real quick to understand why Malone refers to it in the below video as something "a lot of people at a music festival really want") is fully recyclable/compostable, which, of course, means no zippers, plastic doo-dads, nylon flaps or the like. I’d be curious to know more about the actual materials used to produce the tents but I'll take Malone’s word for it.

One Nights Tent was conceived as a low-impact alternative to cheapo fabric tents specifically bought for and unceremoniously trashed at music festivals. Often destroyed/damaged/defiled during the course of the festival, the tents are shoved into overflowing trash cans at the end of the event or simply abandoned in the middle of a field for someone else to deal with.

And in addition to non-recyclable throwaway tents, One Nights Tent also serves as an alternative to sturdier and more "serious" camping tents that festivalgoers might be hesitant to bring along in fear that it will take up too much space in the car or be subjected all sorts of unsavory injury (beer spills, burns, bodily fluids, etc.) For the tent's beta-run at Lowlands, festivalgoers purchased the tents online prior to the festival. Once at the festival, they picked up their purchase(s) at a special kiosk. At the conclusion of the festival, festivalgoers had the option of returning the spent tents to the kiosk for recycling and a returned deposit.

 
 

In addition to temporary shelters, Malone and the One Nights Tent team offered Lowlands attendees recyclable fleece sleeping bags (the "Slap Sack") and also-recyclable air mattresses (the "PSSSH!"). Like with the tent, I’d be curious to know about the design specs and materials used to make the gear. Also, more about its afterlife and the recycling process. While the product website is irrelevant and wacky and fun, I don't think a bit more info on the sustainability front would hurt. 

Malone, who ranked as a finalist in the 2014 Dutch Postcode Lottery Green Challenge business plan competition for his "recyclable campsite" vision, plans to officially launch the One Nights Tent at some in 2015 along with additional offerings. 

Via [PSFK]

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Matt Hickman ( @mattyhick ) writes about design, architecture and the intersection between the natural world and the built environment.