My friends over at The SOAP Group, a very cool small marketing and communications firm here in Portland, Maine, that specializes in doing work that promote sustainability and social justice, made a great bunch of videos for NBC Universal's Green Week about greener living. Entitled "Preachy Green", the series highlights different office members and the various green high horses they climb up on.

Click over and give a watch.

I like the videos for a couple of reasons — first off, they're pretty damn funny. SOAP can act.

But secondly, they reveal that under every preachy green zealot lies a kernel of sustainable truth. Sure the borderline-obnoxious guy who chides you for using disposable coffee cups at the office every morning should figure out a better way to communicate his passions, but the fact is that a LOT of disposable cups get thrown away every year. Yeah, it's not ideal that your co-worker hangs his sweaty bike shorts on the hook while he's showering, but at the same time he is saving a bunch of money and cutting his CO2 footprint by a lot when he rides his bike to work.

I'm guessing that a majority of people who have, at one point or another in their lives, gone "green" have passed through a phase, however short, where they could best be described as "passionate" and at worst described as "obnoxiously green and preachy". I think I was probably kind of a jerk during my preachy phase, especially when I turned vegetarian (I'd like to take this chance to apologize to any of my meat-eating friends who were on the end of one of my anti-meat rants) but, just like in the videos, the core of the matter is that going vegetarian IS way greener than not.

The videos get you to think while you're chuckling. You'll have to click over to the SOAP Group's site to watch. None of the videos are embedable.

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